Saturday, May 3, 2014

WinUSB communication with STM32 round 2 (Part 1: Firmware)

Introduction


I did another WinUsb device. This time I've used STM32F4. Project in Google Code repository is for STM32F4DISCOVERY board featuring STM32F407VGT6.
I wanted to make it so that it wouldn't need Windows side driver information in a form of .inf file. I did it with Windows OS USB descriptors. They are described in subsection on MS "Dev Center - Hardware" Drivers page (links at the end of post). 



Result of device providing these descriptors is Windows loading one of MS provided drivers and associating the device with it as instructed in descriptor gotten from device when plugged in USB port.
"MS provided drivers" are not to be mistaken with "USB device class drivers included in Windows" which are drivers for external HDDs, webcams, HIDs...
WinUSB is one of MS provided drivers providing raw communication with device, e.g. WriteBuffer/ReadBuffer. This means that PC side application and firmware in device must follow some defined communication protocol. These are well defined for standard class USB devices like mouse and keyboard or external HDD but with WinUSB custom protocol can/must be defined. It can be quite simple like adding 4 byte header to transferred buffer holding the length of buffer.

[Update] Windows enumeration

While preparing PC side demo application to demonstrate communication I found out that categorization differs for single interface devices and composite multiple interface devices. Image above shows 2 devices in  device manager each plugged in own USB port and each with single USB interface associated with WinUSB driver. So does the image below with additional Properties window.
Single device with single WinUSB driver associated interface. 

But notice how composite device (having multiple USB interfaces) is shown on next image. Two WinUSB  associated interfaces were reported in descriptors by device:
Single device with two WinUSB driver associated interfaces.
Three devices are shown in Device Manager. One Composite device and two WinUSB devices - one for each interface. WinUSB devices have Composite device set as parent. Note how "Bus reported device description" differs for single interface device from dual interface device.
To test both configuration un/comment WINUSBCOMM_DUAL_INTERFACE_TEST macro in usbd_WinUSBComm.h file.

Windows OS USB descriptors


Text below refers to 'interfaces'. Term is used for a set of endpoints/pipes used in a group. Interfaces have own descriptors.

MS OS String Descriptor


When device is plugged in USB port for the first time on a Windows machine it also receives a standard USB string descriptor request requesting the string descriptor with index 0xEE among other requests during enumeration. For first few indices device responds with standard string descriptors which are Manufacturer, Product and Serial strings (also Language IDs for index 0). Device can ignore 0xEE string descriptor request or respond with data predefined by MS. If so Windows will then query for additional MS specific descriptors:
  • Extended Compat ID OS Descriptor
  • Extended Properties OS Descriptor
  • others not relevant here
The content of MS OS String Descriptor must be:

Value Field Size in Bytes Description
0x12,
bLength
1
Length of the descriptor
0x03,
bDescriptorType
1
Descriptor type - string
0x4D, 0x00,
0x53, 0x00,
0x46, 0x00,
0x54, 0x00,
0x31, 0x00,
0x30, 0x00,
0x30, 0x00,
qwSignature
14
MSFT100” Signature field
MS_VendorCode,
bMS_VendorCode
1
Vendor-specific Vendor code
0x00
bPad
1
Pad field

MS_VendorCode is a value (defined as custom macro in project) which Windows will use to form requests for other descriptors. This gives device developer some leeway to add OS descriptors functionality without clashing with other custom USB requests which device might already support. For new and simple USB devices supporting only single WinUSB interface the vendor code is not that much relevant. Just make it non zero so that it won't cause problems on USB 3 hosts (see specification for more).
Note that Windows queries this descriptor only once. It can be a hassle during development. Information that OS descriptors have been queried for some device is stored in registry under
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\usbflags\VVVVPPPPRRRR
(VVVV - vendor ID; PPPP - product ID; RRRR - revision).
Delete VVVVPPPPRRRR key and also uninstall the device with utility like USDDeview to always get fresh device plug in behavior.

Extended Compat ID OS Descriptor


After device responds with proper 'MS OS String Descriptor' Windows sends a setup packet with request for 'Compat ID OS Descriptor'. Format of request is as follows:

Setup request field Value
bmRequestType b11000000 (device to host transfer direction; vendor type request; recipient is device)
bRequest
MS_VendorCode
wValue 0x0000
wIndex
0x0004 (request for an extended compat ID OS descriptor)
wLength
0x0010 or full length of descriptor

This a chance for device to inform Windows which driver should be loaded. Content below shows WinUSB driver association:

Value Field Size in Bytes Description
0x28, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00,
dwLength
4
The length, in bytes, of the complete extended compat ID descriptor
0x00, 0x01,
bcdVersion
2
The descriptor’s version number, in binary coded decimal (BCD) format
0x04, 0x00,
wIndex
2
An index that identifies the particular OS feature descriptor
0x01,
bCount
1
The number of custom property sections
0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0,
RESERVED
7
Reserved
0,
bFirstInterfaceNumber
1
The interface or function number
0,
RESERVED
1
Reserved
0x57, 0x49, 0x4E, 0x55, 0x53, 0x42, 0x00, 0x00,
compatibleID
8
The function’s compatible ID ("WINUSB")
0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0,
subCompatibleID
8
The function’s subcompatible ID (none)
0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0,
RESERVED
6
Reserved

Descriptor is queried twice. First with only header length (0x10) in wLength field. Then, after full length is known to Windows (from dwLength field) with full length in wLength field.
Each interface in device can have own association. Multiple sections follow the header (in yellow) in case of more interfaces. Descriptor is queried on device level and all associations must be listed in single descriptor. bFirstInterfaceNumber denotes the index of associated interface in each section.

Extended Properties OS Descriptor


After associating the driver with device Windows queries for interface properties. These are meant to provide information which is usually provided in .inf files of drivers, e.g.:

[USB_Install.HW]
AddReg=Dev_AddReg

[Dev_AddReg]
HKR,,DeviceInterfaceGUIDs,0x10000,"{EA0BD5C3-50F3-4888-84B4-74E50E1649DB}"

Properties Descriptor request is also issued twice (or more for descriptors larger than 64kByte). First with wLength set to 0x0A to only retrieve the header and later with wLength set to full length gotten from dwLength.
Following is the layout of USB Setup request:

Setup request field Value
bmRequestType b11000001 (device to host transfer direction; vendor type request; recipient is interface)
bRequest
MS_VendorCode
wValue 0xppii (pp – PageNumber for descriptors larger than 64kB; ii – interface index)
wIndex
0x0005 (request is for an extended properties OS descriptor)
wLength
0x000A or full length of descriptor

Note that properties are queried per interface. So if your device has multiple interfaces the request is send at least twice for each interface (BTW the number of interfaces is known from standard USB configuration descriptor). Following descriptors defines two properties:

  • DeviceInterfaceGUID
    This identifies interface with GUID which is used later in Windows application when querying the OS for devices with SetupDiGetClassDevs
  • Label
    This should be a friendly name displayed for device in Device manager. But apparently it only works form Windows 8 on

Value Field Size in Bytes Description
0xCC, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00,
dwLength
4
The length, in bytes, of the complete extended properties descriptor
0x00, 0x01,
bcdVersion
2
The descriptor’s version number, in binary coded decimal (BCD) format
0x05, 0x00,
wIndex
2
The index for extended properties OS descriptors
0x02, 0x00,
wCount
2
The number of custom property sections that follow the header section
0x84, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00,
dwSize
4
The size of this custom properties section
0x01, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00,
dwPropertyDataType
4
Property data format
0x28, 0x00,
wPropertyNameLength
2
Property name length (PNL)
'D',0, 'e',0, 'v',0, 'i',0, 'c',0, 'e',0, 'I',0, 'n',0, 't',0, 'e',0, 'r',0, 'f',0, 'a',0, 'c',0, 'e',0, 'G',0, 'U',0, 'I',0, 'D',0, 0, 0,
bPropertyName
PNL
The property name (DeviceInterfaceGUID)
0x4E, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00,
dwPropertyDataLength
4
Length of the buffer holding the property data (PDL)
'{',0, 'E',0, 'A',0, '0',0, 'B',0, 'D',0, '5',0, 'C',0, '3',0, '-',0, '5',0, '0',0, 'F',0, '3',0, '-',0, '4',0, '8',0, '8',0, '8',0, '-',0, '8',0, '4',0, 'B',0, '4',0,
'-',0, '7',0, '4',0, 'E',0, '5',0, '0',0, 'E',0, '1',0, '6',0, '4',0, '9',0, 'D',0, 'B',0, '}',0, 0, 0,
bPropertyData
PDL
PDL Format-dependent Property data ({EA0BD5C3-50F3-4888-84B4-74E50E1649DB})
0x3E, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00,
dwSize
4
The size of this custom properties section
0x01, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00,
dwPropertyDataType
4
Property data format
0x0C, 0x00,
wPropertyNameLength
2
Property name length (PNL)
'L',0, 'a',0, 'b',0, 'e',0, 'l',0, 0, 0,
bPropertyName
PNL
The property name (Label)
0x24, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00,
dwPropertyDataLength
4
Length of the buffer holding the property data (PDL)
'W',0, 'i',0, 'n',0, 'U',0, 'S',0, 'B',0, 'C',0, 'o',0, 'm',0, 'm',0, ' ',0, 'd',0, 'e',0, 'v',0, 'i',0, 'c',0, 'e',0, 0, 0

bPropertyData
PDL
PDL Format-dependent Property data (WinUSBComm Device)
These properties are stored in Windows registry at:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Enum\USB\VID_xxxx&PID_xxxx\sssssssss\Device Parameters
Use USDDeview or similar utility to uninstall device and delete this entry while developing.

HW Info


To supply the board from OTG USB micro AB connector you need to connect PA9 pin to 5V pin. This is possible because VBUS is (strangely) connected directly to PA9 VBUS sensing input.

[Update] Comm library

Communication is implemented by implementing Comm layer so that it can be used with Comm library explained separately.

This is first post in this series (of total 2 posts). See 2.

Reference


Links tree below is for my future reference. You probably want to see descriptor specification (in bold).



45 comments:

  1. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. What do you mean with "Winusb template of Visual Studio"?

      You are asking quite widely. I can't answer shortly. As you can see the project is a bit complex and spread across few posts. But nevertheless, I assume you want raw communication from your Windows application to microcontroller. WinUSB is useful because you don't need to write your own kernel driver for device. Optionally you can make your device respond properly to OS descriptor requests and that eliminates the need for driver INF files which need to be signed with Code Signing certificate.
      So, for your device to be recognized as WinUSB device (by Windows) you need to associate it with WinUSB driver. You can do that by writing INF file telling Windows that a device with your VID and PID uses WinUSB.sys. Or you respond to Extended Compat ID OS Descriptor request with "WINUSB" string in compatibleID field as described in the post above.

      If you are asking how you can detect your WinUSB device from application, that is done through DeviceInterfaceGUID property in Extended Properties OS Descriptor. Just be sure to match GUID from descriptor with one used in SetupDiGetClassDevs call.

      Delete
  2. Hello!
    First of all let me thank you for sharing your knowledge!

    I quite noob with programming uC units this low level, but i have an stm32f407vg board that i would like to learn how to use.
    I´m trying to make a program that will generate a series of clocks to control a device and read that device output with 8 different GPIOs. Stack those bytes and send them via USB in FS mode to the PC.
    I´m trying to deal with the USB and came across your blog.
    I struggled a bit to assemble your project and libs, but i think i´ve almost done it.
    I´m getting the following error: ../src/main.c:147: undefined reference to `_sram'
    Where the variable _sram is the argument in this function, i think;
    WinUSBCommSTM32F4_Init(&asCommLayers[0], &sSTM32F4USB.m_sWinUSBCommSTM32F4, &_sram, 0x8FF0);
    _sram is declared like this: extern unsigned char _sram;

    I don´t really understand what this error means.

    Can you give me any help?
    Thanks

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi,

      _sram is just a symbol (not an actual variable) defined in linker file, known at link time. Only it's address is used (&_sram). It is set in linker file as "_sram = ORIGIN(SRAM);" But to use it in source it must somehow be known at compile time. That is why it is declared as "extern unsigned char _sram;" This is saying to compiler: "Yo, somewhere is a variable _sram of type unsigned char." and when compiler hits it's usage with address operator '&' it says: "Ah, an address of some variable is needed here, I'll let linker deal with it." This is a trick to get link time values in your code.

      SRAM is used as communication buffer. WinUSBCommSTM32F4_Init takes the address and size of the buffer. You can use some other address and size if you wish (I think it needs to be in SRAM though but I'm not sure anymore).

      Also, see the STM32F4xxxG.ind and GCCFLASH_CCM.ind included in STM32F407xG.ind and how it is set as ${LinkerFilePath} in Eclipse project C/C++Build/Build Variables and later used in C/C++ Build/Settings/Tool Settings/Cross GCC Linker/Miscellaneous.

      Delete
    2. Hello.
      Thanks for your answer!
      Hum...you gave me some stuff to look into.
      I´m using AC6 to program the board. This IDE already has the settings for the stm32f4Discovery board. It is Eclipse based.
      What i did was to start an empty project coupled with HAL libs and carefully place your files in it.
      It already starts with a LinkerScript.ld which i don´t really know what it does.
      But now that i looked a little into it, i see the resemblance in the structure of the script and those files you told me to look in.
      I copied the content of your files to the linkerScript. I see _sram = ORIGIN(SRAM);
      Also i copied this line: SRAM(RWX) : ORIGIN = 0x20000000, LENGTH = 0x20000 /* 128k */
      and now the MEMORY command looks like this:
      MEMORY
      {
      FLASH (rx) : ORIGIN = 0x08000000, LENGTH = 1024K
      RAM (xrw) : ORIGIN = 0x20000000, LENGTH = 192K
      SRAM (RWX) : ORIGIN = 0x20000000, LENGTH = 0x20000 /* 128k */
      MEMORY_B1 (rx) : ORIGIN = 0x60000000, LENGTH = 0K
      }

      No build errors shown! =)
      Now..i´ll move to the windows side of the program!!
      Thanks a lot for your help!

      Delete
    3. NP.

      Be careful! Since I don't know the rest of your linker file I can't say for sure but you have now defined two memory regions on same address. It might be that something else is put/used in your RAM region. BTW, you could achieve same result by only adding _sram = ORIGIN(RAM); to your linker file.

      Delete
    4. Hey!
      Right. Strange things did happen. I would flash the uC and see the instruction pointer on the debugger pointing to the start of the program, i would press the run button and it would go about its business.
      If i would press the reset button on the board, it would run the previous program i burned.
      That behavior was probably due to those changes in the memory.
      But i just picked the *.bin file generated and burned it with the ST-Link utility - problem solved...(i think)
      I´m still struggling with the VS program.
      Maybe some file is missing. Pulling the files from the GoogleCode was hardworking because i didn´t find a way other than "save link as" to every file. The "checkout" thing really didn´t do it for me.
      I´m getting a lot of missing references and stuff. But i´ll work my way around, i hope.

      Delete
    5. Strange. Last time I checkeddd the projects built. I know Google is discontinuing the code hosting. I didn't have the time to move code elsewhere. But I could checkout complete repo with Tortoise from http://found-bits.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/.

      Regarding strange reset, check 32bit value at address 0x00000004 after downloading the code. Value must point to your reset routine and usually changes when downloading new version of FW due to code position changes. I doubt it's because of linker file change - does empty Hello World example behave the same?
      Check in linker file what goes in RAM. It would be a scope of sections ending with ">RAM" (without quotes). I think your linker file puts variables there and uses it for stack. It's not OK to use it for communication buffer.

      Checkout my other post for linker file explanation.

      Delete
    6. Hello!
      Yep, i was unaware of the Tortoise part. When i googled for "google checkout" all i got was that it was closed and stuff about google wallet, etc..
      Now i got the dir structure right off the link. I´m not yet into all those project, and code management applications and platforms.

      The VS project gives me errors with ToolsVersion not being the right one. I installed VS2010 and still the same error.
      I changed the option "platfrom Toolset" on the property page of the project to "inherit from parent or project defaults"
      Now the error looks like this:
      Project file contains ToolsVersion="12.0". This toolset is unknown or missing. You may be able to resolve this by installing the appropriate .NET Framework for this toolset. Treating the project as if it had ToolsVersion="4.0".
      stdafx.cpp
      c:\found-bits\sources\projects\libs\comm\commtest\winclient\stdafx.h(37): fatal error C1083: Cannot open include file: 'afxcontrolbars.h': No such file or directory

      And now that i used the USBDeview i see that the program in the uC is not running properly, because no USB device is detected other than the debugger port.

      Can you help me?

      Delete
    7. Hi,

      Well start digging. It works on my PC :). First install VS2013 community edition, it's free - you need to register after a month (also free).

      What do you mean debug port only? Are you using this board? FW uses second USB port.

      Delete
    8. Yes! That´s the board. The MINI USB is always plugged, and allows programming and debugging, right? And the MICRO USB should be recognized like a windows USB device.
      But the connection (in any form) is not recognized. It is like if it´s not even plugged.
      I have VS2008,2010 and 2012 installed. I´ve been messing with configurations and now the projects don´t even open any more. "C:\Miscrosoft.Cpp.Default.props was not found"...Moving to VS2013.
      Also I installed .netFW 4.5, buildtools2013 and WinDriverKit 7.1.0. to fix errors that keep appearing..

      How much time did you spent coding?
      I´ve been reading your post about Linker. Interesting stuff.
      Also i found some differences between a linkerscript.ld in some other project that runs ok, and the project that has your code - many sections of the script end up with FLASH in the ok version and in RAM in your version. Even after changing that the program does not seem to work.
      I think my gaps in knowledge wont let me get this to work any time soon...

      Delete
    9. Don't complicate with Visual Studio. 2013 is all you need.

      You might be looking at my linker file for RAM GCCRAM_CCM.ind. It is not used in the project. It's there just as reference for how to make a project that executes from RAM - faster download, no flash programming needed, for tests only. GCCFLASH_CCM.ind is used in the project.

      Can't really tell how much I spent coding this as it was a part of some other project. This is stripped version of that with USB stuff only for my future reference. Also, I had prior knowledge of low level USB and STM32 USB periherals. I did spend few days to study WinUSB, though.

      Don't give up! Keep at it and you will eventually got through.

      Delete
    10. That usb analyzer is quite nice, it let´s us see the protocol in action. Kind of wireshark.
      Also i installed VS2013 and all i needed to do was to build. No errors....go figure...
      Made me look for a pc with win8. Fortunately i was able to get one...
      The part 2 of the windows program is to create a main that accesses the classes you´ve made.
      That´s gonna take a while. So i´ll turn my attention to the uC.
      Thanks a lot for your help. I´ll let you know if i make any progress...or regression :P

      Delete
    11. Info : dropped 'gdb' connection
      Info : accepting 'gdb' connection on tcp/3333
      target state: halted
      target halted due to debug-request, current mode: Thread
      xPSR: 0x01000000 pc: 0x080001dc msp: 0x1ffffff8
      target state: halted
      target halted due to debug-request, current mode: Thread
      xPSR: 0x01000000 pc: 0x080001dc msp: 0x1ffffff8
      target state: halted
      target halted due to breakpoint, current mode: Thread
      xPSR: 0x61000000 pc: 0x20000042 msp: 0x1ffffff8
      target state: halted
      target halted due to debug-request, current mode: Thread
      xPSR: 0x01000000 pc: 0x080001dc msp: 0x1ffffff8
      Error: address + size wrapped(0xffffffff, 0x00000008)
      Error: address + size wrapped(0xffffffff, 0x00000008)
      Error: address + size wrapped(0xffffffff, 0x00000008)
      Error: address + size wrapped(0xffffffff, 0x00000008)
      Error: address + size wrapped(0xffffffff, 0x00000008)
      Error: address + size wrapped(0xffffffff, 0x00000008)
      Error: address + size wrapped(0xffffffff, 0x00000008)
      Error: address + size wrapped(0xffffffff, 0x00000004)
      Error: address + size wrapped(0xffffffff, 0x00000004)

      Delete
    12. Ufff, I don't recognize these. I'm using external debugger. See how to hook it up on my other post.

      Delete
    13. I posted something before the error. It had the 1st part of the error and some other stuff, but it´s not showing on the blog. Never mind...
      I asked you if you could recommend me some specific reading about programming uC.
      I´ve been reading about the different parts of memory on the stm23f4.
      You use a lot of entries to CCM block. And i don´t know what that is.

      Delete
    14. Hmmm, my blog :). Nothing really comes to mind. I know there were some short guides some 10 years ago from Atmel and Microchip. I learned through projects. Doing stuff on assembler level forces you to get to know architecture. Reading uC reference manuals...

      CCM is Closely Coupled Memory in STM32F4. Only for read and write, not for fetching. Checkout RM and data sheet.

      Delete
    15. Yep!
      I´m always saying to the teachers "what about teaching some assembler", and they´r like "oh, that´s not used any more"..and i have tried to follow some tutorials about it. But always have to leave them half way trough because it is to apart of all the things that i need to do and i fail to the relation..Oh well...coming from an arduino platform to this kind of uC is quite a shock..
      But maybe this will kick start me into some heavy ARM stuff, like what you do.
      Thanks a lot for all the info and help. Keep on posting!

      Delete
    16. Hello! How´s it going?
      I manage to get a USB connection. One of the problems was that my usbd_conf.c file didn´t have a #define for usbFS.
      Nevertheless i´m ending up in the default handler while inside the function USBD_LL_Start.
      The struct sent to this function, pdev, is really big, but right at the beginning it has "id" and it´s content is 0. At least that´s what the debugger tell´s me.
      Is this normal?
      The USB connections is detected by windows but ends up with an unrecognized device...

      Delete
    17. That's too low, I don't know by heart. And I don't have time to investigate this for you.
      BTW, I suggest you check Eclipse project for compiler command line defines (-D).

      Delete
  3. Poing!
    One define was missing (HSE=8000000)....it´s working now! I already spent half an hour crying of happiness.
    But i´m still to put your windows program to work to actually see any action.
    Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Hello!Can i get a copy of your project source code,which i couldn't find at the google code webside.Thanks a lot.And my email:oberli@126.com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi. I didn't find time to migrate the code to GitHub yet. But there is an archive download still available on Google Code site: https://code.google.com/archive/p/found-bits/source/default/source

      Delete
    2. Hi.I have received your email.Thank you for your kindness.Thanks a lot.

      Delete
  5. Hello!
    Thanks for an important information. Wold it be worth trying software such as this USB Capture (http://www.eltima.com/products/usb-capture/) to log USB communication?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Probably. I have used FREE USB Protocol Analyzer from HHD Software and tried USBTrace from sysnucleus. AFAIK these are all software hook loggers. They attach to USB hooks prepared by in Windows through some API I forgot. Log they produce is quite helpful.

      Delete
  6. Hi,
    I was trying to port your work to my target (STM32F7) and was able to get a build and running project but I was not able to communicate with the device from the PC (Windows 10).
    I try to investigate this and found that the 0xEE string request is not perfomed (I printed all the string descriptor requests and it was not there)
    I follow the link you gave to Microsoft OS 2.0 Descriptors Specification and saw that it is not using the 0xEE any more.
    Is that mean that I cannot use the ported project on my machine or should I do somthing else that I'm missing?
    Can you please advise on that?
    Thanks,
    Eyal

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Quote from post above:
      Note that Windows queries this descriptor only once. It can be a hassle during development. Information that OS descriptors have been queried for some device is stored in registry under
      HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\usbflags\VVVVPPPPRRRR
      (VVVV - vendor ID; PPPP - product ID; RRRR - revision).
      Delete VVVVPPPPRRRR key and also uninstall the device with utility like USDDeview to always get fresh device plug in behavior.
      End quote.
      0xEE string descriptor query is deprecated by MS but it still works - I just did a device this way. BOS descriptors are the way to go. Anyway, try clearing device info.

      Delete
    2. Thanks for your quick reply, I did uninstalled the device before I test it, I just tried that again and you can see from the list below what is being quired by the host, I don't see the 0xEE there.
      Is there an option that the WinUSB is not installed on my system from some reason? I thought it is there as a defualt Win 10, isen't it?
      WinUSB
      USBD_WinUSBComm_DeviceDescriptor
      USBD_WinUSBComm_DeviceDescriptor
      USBD_WinUSBComm_GetCfgDesc
      USB_DESC_TYPE_STRING 0X303
      USBD_WinUSBComm_SerialStrDescriptor
      USBD_WinUSBComm_Setup
      USBD_WinUSBComm_Setup
      USB_DESC_TYPE_STRING 0X300
      USBD_WinUSBComm_LangIDStrDescriptor
      USB_DESC_TYPE_STRING 0X302
      USBD_WinUSBComm_ProductStrDescriptor
      USBD_WinUSBComm_DeviceDescriptor
      USBD_WinUSBComm_GetCfgDesc
      USBD_WinUSBComm_GetCfgDesc
      USBD_WinUSBComm_Setup
      USBD_WinUSBComm_Setup
      USBD_WinUSBComm_DeviceDescriptor
      USBD_WinUSBComm_GetCfgDesc
      USBD_WinUSBComm_GetCfgDesc
      USBD_WinUSBComm_Init
      USB_DESC_TYPE_STRING 0X300
      USBD_WinUSBComm_LangIDStrDescriptor
      USBD_WinUSBComm_EP0_TxReady
      USB_DESC_TYPE_STRING 0X301
      USBD_WinUSBComm_ManufacturerStrDescriptor
      USBD_WinUSBComm_EP0_TxReady
      USB_DESC_TYPE_STRING 0X302
      USBD_WinUSBComm_ProductStrDescriptor
      USBD_WinUSBComm_EP0_TxReady
      USB_DESC_TYPE_STRING 0X303
      USBD_WinUSBComm_SerialStrDescriptor
      USBD_WinUSBComm_EP0_TxReady
      USBD_WinUSBComm_GetDeviceQualifierDesc
      USBD_WinUSBComm_EP0_TxReady
      USBD_WinUSBComm_GetCfgDesc
      USBD_WinUSBComm_EP0_TxReady
      USBD_WinUSBComm_GetCfgDesc
      USBD_WinUSBComm_EP0_TxReady
      USB_DESC_TYPE_STRING 0X300
      USBD_WinUSBComm_LangIDStrDescriptor
      USBD_WinUSBComm_EP0_TxReady
      USB_DESC_TYPE_STRING 0X301
      USBD_WinUSBComm_ManufacturerStrDescriptor
      USBD_WinUSBComm_EP0_TxReady
      USB_DESC_TYPE_STRING 0X302
      USBD_WinUSBComm_ProductStrDescriptor
      USBD_WinUSBComm_EP0_TxReady
      USB_DESC_TYPE_STRING 0X304
      USBD_WinUSBComm_ConfigStrDescriptor
      USBD_WinUSBComm_EP0_TxReady
      USB_DESC_TYPE_STRING 0X305
      USBD_WinUSBComm_InterfaceStrDescriptor
      USBD_WinUSBComm_EP0_TxReady
      USB_DESC_TYPE_STRING 0X300
      USBD_WinUSBComm_LangIDStrDescriptor
      USBD_WinUSBComm_EP0_TxReady
      USB_DESC_TYPE_STRING 0X301
      USBD_WinUSBComm_ManufacturerStrDescriptor
      USBD_WinUSBComm_EP0_TxReady
      USB_DESC_TYPE_STRING 0X302
      USBD_WinUSBComm_ProductStrDescriptor
      USBD_WinUSBComm_EP0_TxReady
      USB_DESC_TYPE_STRING 0X300
      USBD_WinUSBComm_LangIDStrDescriptor
      USBD_WinUSBComm_EP0_TxReady
      USB_DESC_TYPE_STRING 0X301
      USBD_WinUSBComm_ManufacturerStrDescriptor
      USBD_WinUSBComm_EP0_TxReady
      USB_DESC_TYPE_STRING 0X302
      USBD_WinUSBComm_ProductStrDescriptor
      USBD_WinUSBComm_EP0_TxReady
      USBD_WinUSBComm_GetDeviceQualifierDesc
      USBD_WinUSBComm_EP0_TxReady
      USBD_WinUSBComm_GetCfgDesc
      USBD_WinUSBComm_EP0_TxReady
      USBD_WinUSBComm_GetCfgDesc
      USBD_WinUSBComm_EP0_TxReady
      USB_DESC_TYPE_STRING 0X300
      USBD_WinUSBComm_LangIDStrDescriptor
      USBD_WinUSBComm_EP0_TxReady
      USB_DESC_TYPE_STRING 0X301
      USBD_WinUSBComm_ManufacturerStrDescriptor
      USBD_WinUSBComm_EP0_TxReady
      USB_DESC_TYPE_STRING 0X302
      USBD_WinUSBComm_ProductStrDescriptor
      USBD_WinUSBComm_EP0_TxReady
      USB_DESC_TYPE_STRING 0X304
      USBD_WinUSBComm_ConfigStrDescriptor
      USBD_WinUSBComm_EP0_TxReady
      USB_DESC_TYPE_STRING 0X305
      USBD_WinUSBComm_InterfaceStrDescriptor
      USBD_WinUSBComm_EP0_TxReady

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    3. I don't know where this dump is from. Did you try to record the USB request with some USB analyzer tool (e.g. USBlyzer) to see all requests? You need an analyzer that will record hot plugged devices.
      Also, ST USB library handles string descriptors separately in USBD_DescriptorsTypeDef for standard descriptors. I return OS string descriptor in call to GetUsrStrDescriptor of USBD_ClassTypeDef type.
      You need to #define USBD_SUPPORT_USER_STRING 1 for this to work.
      This info is based on usage of STM32Cube_FW_F1_V1.6.0 (so, totally out of sync with the blog post).

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    4. The dump is from my printfs within the code.
      I don't have USBlyzer license, I'm using HHD SW device monitoring and I recorded a session after I uninstall the device and re-plugged it but I did not see any 0xEE string request.
      I have USBD_SUPPORT_USER_STRING set to 1.
      I'm using updated STM32Cube F4 1.17 and F7 1.8
      I added a printf in usbd_ctlreq.c @ function USBD_GetDescriptor where the host requests are being processed under the string case:
      case USB_DESC_TYPE_STRING:
      printf("USB_DESC_TYPE_STRING 0X%X\r\n",req->wValue);
      You said that the 0xEE is deprecated by MS but it still works, is there a way for me to test it on my PC without connecting to my target STM32?
      I think it might be something that I need to install under windows in order to have it.
      Do you have an updated version of the project that I can test at my end?
      Thanks,
      Eyal

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    5. Hmmm... I read somewhere that MS is keeping a list of devices that have problem with 0xEE string descriptor request. Maybe change VID and PID to test. Also it doesn't work with devices prior to USB2.0 - check USB line pull up resistor.
      With reasonable low effort I can currently only built you a binary image to test with modified BluePill board (STM32F103) - do you have it? Maybe unmodified.
      Does GetUsrStrDescriptor get called?

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    6. Changing the VID\PID did not helped
      The device is identified as USB2.0 in USBDview
      GetUsrStrDescriptor is not being called
      I don't have the BluePill
      I'm sorry but I have to ask again, do I need to do some installation on my PC Win 10 in order to have the WinUSB or should it be part of Win 10 as a default?
      Thanks
      Eyal

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    7. Sorry for not answering directly before, you don't have to install anything or enable anything in Win10 AFAIK.

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    8. Hi,
      After a lot of digging I realized that the uninstalling of the device was not enough, I changed the PI\VID and I saw that I get the EE so I'm good with that issue.
      Now, I try to use some C# code I found to communicate with the device, I can see that the device receive and transmit on EP0.
      If I send data to EP2 it is receive on the device side but only once, the second time from some reason is not working.
      Since I did not port all the communication protocol part of your code I'm trying first only to send and receive a simple 64 bytes of data (loopback).
      I see that if I add to the USBD_WinUSBComm_DataOut a call to USBD_LL_Transmit it is working, but again, only once.
      I can see that when I try to send the second transmission it is not reach the device at all.
      Any idea what can be the problem?
      Thanks,
      Eyal

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    9. What? Uninstalling and manually deleting the registry keys didn't make Windows query for 0xEE string descriptor again? This worked for me a month or so ago.
      Anyway... I'm happy for your progress.
      You now only have a device associated with WinUSB driver which allows you pushing and pulling data from USB endpoints from user space. How you are going to do it it's up to you. What you want to achieve is that device is ready to receive data when you are sending it from PC side. Kind of flow control. Device will NAK (or STALL) any USB request to some EP until your application (in device) tells it receive (or send) data.
      I do it with commands from PC via control EP0. In general like follows:
      - PC sends "incoming N bytes of data" message via EP0 to device
      - Device calls USB lib function to receive N bytes on EPa
      - PC writes N bytes to EPa
      - Device receives data on EPa and starts processing it
      - PC sends "any data to return?" message to EP0
      - Device returns 0 if no data available or M otherwise (on EP0) and calls USB lib function to send M bytes of data on EPb
      - PC is repeating "any data to return" message until it gets nonzero value (M)
      - PC reads M bytes from EPb

      Which are specific function I don't know by heart - I have to study this every time.

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    10. Thanks for the very detailed answer, it was a great help and now I can send multiple packets with no problem.
      I still have a problem though with sending my custom messages over EP0, I believe it is related to flaw control as it was with the EPn messages.
      How should I handle flow control with EP0? Ack? etc.
      I found those function relevant to this issue but I'm not sure in what sequence I should use them:
      USBD_CtlSendData
      USBD_CtlContinueSendData
      USBD_CtlPrepareRx
      USBD_CtlContinueRx
      USBD_CtlSendStatus
      USBD_CtlReceiveStatus
      USBD_GetRxCount

      Thanks,
      Eyal

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    11. I don't think you need to worry about flow control on EP0. Just keep command packets in size less than EP0 buffer size (8B or is it 64B). Your device code handlers will be called in general like:
      For commands with incoming data (relative to device):
      - "Incoming data on EP0"; where to put it?
      - "Incoming data on EP0 received" (this is where you parse it and act on it, e.g. send application data on bulk EP)
      For commands with outgoing data (relative to device):
      - "Give data to send" (e.g. this is where you provide the number of bytes to be sent over bulk EP to application on PC)

      Note that commands should be given not in data stage of USB control transfer (http://www.beyondlogic.org/usbnutshell/usb4.shtml#Control) but rather in the setup stage of USB transfer (http://www.beyondlogic.org/usbnutshell/usb6.shtml#SetupPacket).
      I set:
      - Recipient to 1(Interface) and type to 2(Vendor) in bmRequestType filed.
      - bRequest to my chosen/madeup value (command)
      - wIndex to the USB interface index addressed (0, unless you have multiple pairs of bulk in/out EPs associated with WinUSB driver in one device; see Windows enumeration up in the post)
      - I think I don't use wValue
      Payload sizes are transferred in data stage. I could use wValue for incoming packet size probably.

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    12. I have following two handlers in my unpublished code:
      unsigned char WinUSBComm_SetupVendorInterface(USBD_HandleTypeDef *pdev, SWinUSBCommSTM32 *psWinUSBCommSTM32, unsigned char byRequest)
      {
      switch ( byRequest )
      {
      case winusbcomm2commandReset:
      psWinUSBCommSTM32->m_dwExpectedByteCountUSB = 0;
      psWinUSBCommSTM32->m_dwSendByteCountUSB = 0;
      break;
      case winusbcomm2commandGetVersion: USBD_CtlSendData(pdev, &s_byWinUSBCommVersion, 1); break;
      case winusbcomm2commandGetState: USBD_CtlSendData(pdev, &psWinUSBCommSTM32->m_byStateUSB, 1); break;
      case winusbcomm2commandGetBufferSize: USBD_CtlSendData(pdev, (uint8_t*)(&psWinUSBCommSTM32->m_dwBufferSizeInBytes), 4); break;
      case winusbcomm2commandGetReturnSize: USBD_CtlSendData(pdev, (uint8_t*)(&psWinUSBCommSTM32->m_dwSendByteCountUSB), 4); break;
      case winusbcomm2commandFollowingPacketSize:
      psWinUSBCommSTM32->m_dwReceivedByteCount = 0;
      USBD_CtlPrepareRx(pdev, (uint8_t*)(&psWinUSBCommSTM32->m_dwExpectedByteCountUSB), 4); break;
      default:
      return USBD_FAIL;
      }
      return USBD_OK;
      }

      And when incoming data size arrives:

      void WinUSBComm_EP0_RxReady(USBD_HandleTypeDef *pdev, SWinUSBCommSTM32 *psWinUSBCommSTM32, unsigned char byRequest)
      {
      switch ( byRequest )
      {
      case winusbcomm2commandFollowingPacketSize:
      USBD_LL_PrepareReceive(pdev, psWinUSBCommSTM32->m_byEPOutAddress, psWinUSBCommSTM32->m_pbyBuffer, psWinUSBCommSTM32->m_dwExpectedByteCountUSB);
      break;
      default:
      break;
      }
      USBD_WinUSBComm_UpdateState(psWinUSBCommSTM32);
      }

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    13. Based on your reply I was able to read and write from both EP0 and EPn! Thanks
      Now, After I had a based working project on both ends (FW and PC WIN10 C#) based on http://janaxelson.com WinUsb_cs I wanted to start to develop my proprietary data flow.
      But, from unclear reason or action I suddenly have a problem when I call FindMyDevice(), its look like the FW side registered OK on the PC (I started to use USBlyzer...):

      Description: WinUsb Device
      Instance Status: 0180600Ah DN_DRIVER_LOADED
      DN_STARTED
      DN_DISABLEABLE
      DN_REMOVABLE
      DN_NT_ENUMERATOR
      DN_NT_DRIVER
      Instance ID: USB\VID_26F9&PID_7555\SSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS1
      Hardware IDs: USB\VID_26F9&PID_7555&REV_0200
      USB\VID_26F9&PID_7555
      Compatible IDs: USB\MS_COMP_WINUSB
      USB\Class_FF&SubClass_00&Prot_00
      USB\Class_FF&SubClass_00
      USB\Class_FF
      Service Name: WINUSB
      Setup Class: USBDevice
      Setup Class Description: Universal Serial Bus devices
      Setup Class GUID: {88bae032-5a81-49f0-bc3d-a4ff138216d6}
      Software Key: {88bae032-5a81-49f0-bc3d-a4ff138216d6}\0037
      Manufacturer: WinUsb Device
      Friendly Name: WinUSBComm Device in HS Mode
      Hardware Location: Port_#0003.Hub_#0010
      PDO Name: \Device\USBPDO-21

      But the call to SetupDiGetClassDevs with {88bae032-5a81-49f0-bc3d-a4ff138216d6} fail to get any devices?!

      What could be wrong?

      I'm pretty sure that there is no change in the code that used to work, I suspect that something on Windows registry is causing this but I have no idea where to start looking for it.

      I tried to uninstall the device from USBDview and delete the registry entry under HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\usbflags\26F975550200 but this did not helped.

      Thanks,
      Eyal

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    14. Is {88bae032-5a81-49f0-bc3d-a4ff138216d6} the GUID you give in OS descriptor of your device?
      I use my own made up GUID. Find "DeviceInterfaceGUID" in the post. I always use this and never had problems.
      The GUID you mention seems to be related to WinUSB driver.

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    15. No, In the device I used a private GUID, this GUID {88bae032-5a81-49f0-bc3d-a4ff138216d6} is used by windows SetupDiGetClassDevs setupapi.dll to find all the WinUSB devices, it is the Interface class GUID for WinUSB

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    16. Well, try calling SetupDiGetClassDevs with your private GUID.

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  7. Hi,

    I got over the problem with the GUID, thanks,

    I'm now trying to achieve the fastest transfer rate possible, I see that you defined the EPs like that:

    /******************** Some interface over WinUSB Endpoints ********************/
    0x07, /*Endpoint descriptor length = 7*/
    0x05, /*Endpoint descriptor type */
    WINUSBCOMM_EPIN_ADDR, /*Endpoint address (IN, address 1) */
    0x02, /*Bulk endpoint type */
    LOBYTE(WINUSBCOMM_MAX_FS_PACKET),
    HIBYTE(WINUSBCOMM_MAX_FS_PACKET),

    first, if I use HS, it should be at least WINUSBCOMM_MAX_HS_PACKET (i.e. 512 and not 64), isn't it? and any how, what are the maximum possible sizes I can use?

    I need to transfer pictures frames of size around 600K,

    Thanks

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